Posts Tagged training

A user is just a number

A Unix heaven is, in my opinion, where everybody in an organization is a Unix user and has a Unix account, be it on a centralized mainframe or on a personal workstation. I could dream of that forever, despite the cruel reality being that even if everybody was a user, A user is really nothing […]

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To upgrade or not to upgrade?

That’s another great sysadmin’s dilemma: do you do updates often, trying to keep your systems at the “cutting edge” and have all the security patches upplied immediately upon official release, or do you roll the updates out as discretely as possible, not trying to fix something that’s not [still] broken? That, and the fine topic […]

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chattr for hackers

Yet another boring chapter, Chapter 5 the filesystem in the “UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook”, bar the excellent overview of the ACL topic, still has a bit of fun going on. Linux defines a set of supplemental flags that can be set on files to request special handling. The immutable and append-only flags (i […]

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cron vs. systemd timers

This is from the Chapter 4 about the process control of the “UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook” – once again systemd ripples the waters and, IMO is almost a clear winner, despite the hesitation expressed by the book authors. systemd timers is a feature superset of cron, and rather huge one at that. Out […]

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sudo or not sudo

Nothing prevents you from changing the username on this [root] account or from creating additional accounts whose UIDs are 0; however, these are both bad ideas. That was the most profound saying in probably the most boring chapter of the “UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook”, Chapter 3, about the root account and related topics. […]

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init vs. systemd

Chapter 2 of the “UNIX and Linux System Administration Handbook” talks about the boot process. Nothing special here, except…ever so interesting debate of init vs. systemd. The main points from systemd opponents being making the system more complex and less modular. Modularity, as we all know, is one of the Unix’ main merits. OTOH, general […]

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System administration: How to start?

Today, a good friend of mine Nikolai Dyumin, a seasoned PhD in mathematics, asked me of a recommended book on the Unix system administration topic. Immediately I recalled of the “Unix System Administration Handbook” by Evi Nemeth “and kids” paper back sample of the 2nd edition I have had and praised a lot since my […]

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